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OH Noes! Increased Carbon Dioxide Making More Flowers In Tropical Forests

“PLANTS convert atmospheric carbon dioxide into energy in the form of sugars, which they can use to fuel any number of vital life processes. As more carbon dioxide is released into the atmosphere, plants have an opportunity to produce a bounty of new energy.”

SHOCK HORROR!! Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and warmth are what eco-systems require to flourish 😱

Watts Up With That?

From FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY and the “but wait, all climate change must be bad!” department.

Climate change linked to more flowery forests, FSU study shows

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — New research from a Florida State University scientist has revealed a surprising relationship between surging atmospheric carbon dioxide and flower blooms in a remote tropical forest.

FSU researchers studying the rich tropical forests of Panama’s Barro Colorado Island found that climbing rates of carbon dioxide have set the stage for a multidecade increase in overall flower production.

The findings were outlined in a paper published in the journal Global Change Biology

“It’s really remarkable,” said Assistant Professor of Geography Stephanie Pau, who led the study. “Over the past several decades, we’ve seen temperatures warming and carbon dioxide increasing, and our study found that this tropical forest has responded to that increase by producing more flowers.”

Pau’s findings suggest that tropical forests, which…

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Aussie Heatwave Electricity Shortfall, Hospital Emergency Measures, Coal Blamed

“THE takeaway lesson for Australian politicians and people throughout the world should be that you can’t run hospitals and businesses on unreliable electricity. Next time turning off the cafeteria lights might not be enough; people will die if this renewable energy idiocy continues. Lets hope enough politicians learn this lesson quickly enough to avert a major disaster.”

Watts Up With That?

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

h/t JoNova – South Australia and the Australian State of Victoria learned the hard way that when power demand surges, you can’t turn up the solar panels.

Melbourne hospitals switch off lights as mercury rises

Grant McArthur and Aleks Devic, Herald Sun
January 19, 2018 7:36pm

PATIENTS were left in the dark after one of Melbourne’s biggest hospitals switched off its lights and non-essential equipment as temperatures soared on Friday.

The Alfred turned off the lights on wards, in corridors and cafeterias about midday in a bid to conserve power.

The dramatic move followed a Department of Health memo to hospital chiefs on Thursday night asking them to ensure back-up power supplies were effective, prompted by the increased risk of disruption in the heatwave.

“Hospitals within Alfred Health have taken the initiative to act as good corporate citizens and reduce the use of electricity that…

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Batteries Rupture At ‘Green’ Royal Adelaide Hospital

“The affected batteries are separate to the hospital’s back-up power system, which includes six diesel generators.”

TOXIC batteries and “green” diesel used in a state-of-the-art South Australian hospital to (hopefully) provide energy to the sick and dying when the wind stops or the sun doesn’t shine!?

“GREEN” energy – sending Australia back to the stone-age one windmill and solar panel at a time… 🤦‍♂️

Royal_Adelaide_Hospital The Royal Adelaide Hospital ran $640 million over budget.

Four giant batteries installed inside the new $2.4 billion Royal Adelaide Hospital to help the facility meet the Weatherill government’s strict low-emission targets have ruptured without warning, spilling 80 litres of sulphuric acid.

The batteries are made by Century Yuasa, Australia’s oldest battery manufacturer and an ­affiliate of GS Yuasa Corporation, the maker of burned-out lithium-ion batteries at the centre of the worldwide grounding of Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner jets in 2013.

The toxic accident in a power generator room inside the hospital, which opened in September after delays and legal disputes over building defects, saw one person exposed and decontaminated at the scene by firefighters.

The incident occurred just after 7pm on Monday, with four fire crews responding to an alarm.

Emergency services found four large wet cell batteries had ruptured.

Yesterday, the state government sought to play down the incident…

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