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DIESEL-POWERED Climate Junket : UNreliables Confirmed As Token Gestures To The Folly Of ‘Green’ Madness

UN COP24 DIESEL POWER - Climatism

UN COP24 Diesel Power | Climatism


Giving society cheap, abundant energy would be the
equivalent of giving an idiot child a machine gun
.”
– Prof Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University/Royal Society fellow

If we don’t overthrow capitalism, we don’t have a chance of
saving the world ecologically. I think it is possible to have
an ecologically sound society under socialism.
I don’t think it is possible under capitalism

– Judi Bari,
principal organiser Earth First, UN consultant

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ISN’T the latest COP 24 climate junket in Poland, with 22,771 taxpayer funded, jet-setting delegates in attendance, the PERFECT event to showcase the wonders of 100% Renewables UNreliables – wind and solar?

WHY then is the latest UN “Save The Planet” climate change conference 100% powered by “dirty” fossil fuels?

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ON the ground with The Rebel Media :

It’s another United Nations Climate Change Conference and you know what that means! Plenty of fossil fuels are being used to keep the fancy dignitaries comfortable.

At my first climate change conference in Morocco, the desert conference was air conditioned and cool despite the Moroccan sun outside.

Last year in Bonn Germany, we followed a tangle of power cords back to find the diesel generators powering the conference on the Rhine River banks.

This year is no different. Fossil fuels have a starring role in Katowice, Poland.

We found the army of frost fighter diesel heaters — the kind seen everyday in the oil patch — being used to keep everyone snuggly and warm inside the conference as the snow falls outside.

Frost-fighting diesel generators warm UN dignitaries at Global Warming conference | The Rebel

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DIESEL TO THE RESCUE!

DIESEL has become the petrochemical substance of choice for ‘Green’ energy zealots acting as cover for the unreliability of their hallowed ‘clean’ energy devices:

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THE ‘green’ energy madness that threatens our ability to turn on the lights and heating further exposed as an ineffective, socialist policy-driven, big government debacle, right at ground zero of ‘renewable energy’ cheerleading – the UN climate conference!

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SEE also :

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‘GREEN’ Killing Fields: Wind Turbines Responsible For Massive & Unnecessary Bird Slaughter

“Bird mortality by wind turbines is such a well-established fact in wind energy circles that in 2013 a wind energy company agreed to pay $1 million in fines after the Justice Department proved it guilty in a first criminal case against a wind power company for the deaths of protected birds.”

STATE-sanctioned bird and bat slaughter.

WHERE’S the outrage from ‘green’ and ‘environmental’ groups? Crickets.

STOP THESE THINGS

Golden Eagle ‘transitions’ to California’s wind powered future …

Renewable energy zealots didn’t invent hypocrisy, but they seem quite comfortable wearing it, like their very own badge of honour.

If wind power was even close to being a meaningful power generation source, you might, just might justify the wave of environmental and societal destruction that comes with it. Abandoned centuries ago for pretty obvious reasons, wind power was redundant the moment James Watt turned steam into motive force.

The wind cult, however, have no difficulty in justifying the destruction of pristine landscapes; the dismemberment of once cohesive, rural communities; the creation of toxic waste lands in China (where the rare earths essential to wind turbines are processed); power prices that punish the poorest and most vulnerable in society; and barely bat an eyelid at the slaughter of millions upon millions of birds and bats, across the globe.

The carnage…

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STARK Reminder That Climate Bedwetters Are Mere Groupthink Puppets To The Hypocritical Rants Of Their Malthusian Leaders

Greenpeace Filling Up on Fossil Fuels

Greenpeace Filling Up on Fossil Fuels

GREENPEACE is a strident campaigner against big oil, especially against BP. Why isn’t the Rainbow Warrior running on solar power or wind power?

Kayaktivists protesting against oil exploration in kayaks made of oil

KAYAKTIVISTS protesting against oil exploration using kayaks made from oil. The paddles they use are plastic. The personal flotation devices heavily dependent on synthetic material derived from petroleum. The leader of the protest garbed in synthetic clothing with a petroleum-based megaphone in hand.

Nuff said.

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UPDATE

This graphic says it all…

H/t  

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KEEPING It In The Ground…

Cobalt Mining + Apple.jpg

Trucks at the Murrin Murrin nickel-cobalt mining joint venture in Western Australia | The Australian

THE next time you are met with the fashionable climate hashtag #keepitintheground by a holier-than-thou climate warrior, calmly remind them that their iPhone, iPad and electric car is not as “sustainable” as they might have hoped for and definitely doesn’t run on a planet-friendly diet of tofu and mung beans.

THEN advise them to direct their misinformed, groupthink-enabled rage at their silicone valley eco-icons – Elon Musk and Apple et al – who are digging gigantic holes in the ground too. Oh, and hiring child miners aged 4 who are living a hell on earth in the Congo mining for their Cobalt…

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via The Australian

Apple fires up fight for cobalt

  • The Times

Apple is seeking to buy cobalt directly from mining companies amid a looming shortage of the metal, a key ingredient for the lithium-ion batteries in its iPhones and iPads.

Fearful that the boom in electric cars might put pressure on supplies, the Californian technology giant has been in discussions to secure contracts for “several thousand metric tons” of cobalt each year for at least five years, according to Bloomberg.

While smartphones use an estimated ten grams of refined cobalt, a typical electric car battery uses five to ten kilograms.

If sales of electric vehicles hit a forecast of 30 million by 2030, it will drive further explosive growth in cobalt demand, according to research for Glencore, the mining company, by CRU, a commodities analyst. It forecasts a “material” impact from demand for electric cars by as early as 2020, with an extra 24,000 tonnes needed as early as 2020, compared with about 110,000 tonnes mined globally in 2017 and an additional 314,000 tonnes by 2030.

If Apple secures its own cobalt contracts, rather than leaving it to companies that supply its batteries, it could find itself in fierce competition with carmakers for the metal.

The talks, understood to have begun more than a year ago, come after a tripling in the price of cobalt in the past 18 months, as carmakers jump into the fully electric or hybrid power business, following the likes of Toyota and Tesla. Countries including Britain and France have said that they will ban the sale of petrol and diesel cars from 2040.

Apple declined to comment on the talks. However, Ivan Glasenberg, chief executive of Glencore, the world’s biggest cobalt producer, said in December that the iPhone maker was among the companies it was talking to about cobalt, along with Tesla and Volkswagen.

Overnight (AEDT) Mr Glasenberg said that no deal had been signed. “We don’t have any long-term contracts with Apple; we haven’t signed anything with Apple.”

He added: “We have seen the investments that motor car companies are making in electric vehicles and they will need battery supply, so the demand for electric vehicles is strong. It will require a lot of cobalt and we all know the geological scarcity of cobalt.”

Mr Glasenberg noted that supply was “relatively constrained”, as cobalt could not be mined like lithium, but was a by-product mainly of copper and nickel.

There are also questions about the stability of supply in the Democratic Republic of Congo after a vote last month by its parliament to raise royalties on mining. The change is designed to ensure that the country gets a bigger share of the money paid for its commodities, but it will raise costs for producers.

Mining companies are lobbying against the change, which Mr Glasenberg said would lead to under-investment. “Can the world produce as much cobalt (as) it’s going to need? … What happens in the DRC is going to be very important going forward,” he said.

Apple’s move to secure its own supplies of cobalt comes amid a global drive to safeguard supplies of crucial metals used in electronics while reducing dependence on the DRC, which supplies two thirds of the world’s cobalt but has been criticised for human rights abuses, including using child labour.

Cobalt miners in the Congo. Pic: Reuters
Cobalt miners in the Congo. Pic: Reuters

In response to criticism from human rights groups, Apple now uses only cobalt refined and smelted in China, Belgium and Finland. It will accept metal from the DRC only if it comes from mines that can prove they provide adequate health and safety protections and safeguards against child labour.

Michael Giblin, mining analyst at S & P Global Market Intelligence, said that end-users of cobalt were already looking for alternatives to the metal.

“Due to the rapid increase in the cobalt price over the last year, plus the fact that the majority of cobalt will be sourced from areas with political and social instability, battery technology is being continually evolved to reduce the reliance on cobalt.

“Conventional battery chemistries are being modified to reduce the cobalt content by increasing content of other metals such as nickel or manganese.”

With Emily Gosden

The Times

Apple fires up fight for cobalt | The Australian

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DRACONIAN Climate Change Policies Making World Hunger Worse

World Hunger UN Climate policy

Climate policies are diverting resources from measures that directly reduce hunger, which according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation is on the rise. | The Australian

ANTHROPOGENIC “climate change” and the control of carbon dioxide, via the supply of energy, has deep roots in a radical yet gravely misguided campaign to reduce the world’s population.

A misanthropic agenda engineered by the environmental movement in the mid 1970’s, who realised that doing something about “global warming” would play to quite a number of its social agendas.

THE goal was advanced, most notably, by The Club Of Rome (Environmental think-tank and consultants to the UN) – a group of mainly European scientists and academics, who used computer modelling to warn that the world would run out of finite resources if population growth were left unchecked.

The common enemy of humanity is man.
In searching for a new enemy to unite us, we came up
with the idea that pollution, the threat of global warming,
water shortages, famine and the like would fit the bill. All these
dangers are caused by human intervention, and it is only through
changed attitudes and behaviour that they can be overcome.
The real enemy then, is humanity itself
.
– Club of Rome 1993,
premier environmental think-tank,
consultants to the United Nations

SO, it comes as no surprise that today’s UN is successfully upholding its misanthropic agenda by attempting to starve control the world’s population through a blatant misallocation of resources, in favour of wanting to control the weather, rather than feed the most needy, for a fraction of the cost.

MEMO to the UN – If you want to reduce the world’s population, provide the third-world with cheap, reliable fossil-fuelled or nuclear power generation to lift them out of abject poverty. Wealthy (fossil-fuel/nuclear powered) nations have predominant negative birth rates. Poverty is the enemy of the environment.

Bjorn Lomborg with more via his column in The Australian

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Climate-change policies may be making world hunger worse

BJORN LOMBORG // @BjornLomborg via The Australian :

For more than a decade, annual data showed global hunger to be on the decline. But that has changed. According to the latest data from the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation, hunger affected 815 million people in 2016, 38 million more than the year before, and malnutrition is now threatening millions.

Research from my think tank, Copenhagen Consensus, has long helped to focus attention and resources on the most effective responses to malnutrition, both globally and in countries such as Haiti and Bangladesh. Unfortunately, there are worrying signs that the global response may be headed in the wrong direction.

The FAO blames the rise in hunger on a proliferation of violent conflicts and “climate-related shocks”. which means specific, extreme events such as floods and droughts.

But in the FAO’s press release, “climate-related shocks” becomes “climate change”. The report itself links the two without citing evidence, but the FAO’s communique goes further, declaring starkly: “World hunger again on the rise, driven by conflict and climate change.”

It may seem like a tiny step to go from blaming climate-related shocks to blaming climate change. Both terms relate to the weather. But that little difference means a lot, especially when it comes to the most important question: how do we help to better feed the world? Jumping the gun and blaming climate change for today’s crises attracts attention, but it makes us focus on the costliest and least effective responses.

The best evidence comes from the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which has clearly shown that there has been no overall increase in droughts. While some parts of the world are experiencing more and worse droughts, others are experiencing fewer and lighter droughts.

A comprehensive study in the journal Naturedemonstrates that, since 1982, incidents of all categories of drought, from “abnormally dry” to “exceptional drought”, have decreased slightly. On flooding, the IPCC is even blunter: it has “low confidence” at a global level about whether climate change has caused more or less flooding.

What the IPCC tells us is that by the end of the century, it is likely that worse droughts will affect some parts of the world. And it predicts — albeit with low confidence — that there could be more floods in some places.

Relying on climate policies to fight hunger is doomed. Any realistic carbon cuts will be expensive and have virtually no impact on climate by the end of the century. The Paris climate agreement, even if fully implemented up to 2030, would achieve just 1 per cent of the cuts needed to keep temperature from rising more than 2C, according to the UN.

And it would cost $US 1 trillion a year or more — an incredibly expensive way to make no meaningful difference to a potential increase in flooding and droughts at the end of the century.

In fact, well-intentioned policies to combat global warming could very well be exacerbating hunger. Rich countries have embraced biofuels — energy derived from plants — to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels. But the climate benefit is negligible: according to the International Institute for Sustainable Development, deforestation, fertiliser, and fossil fuels used in producing biofuels offset about 90 per cent of the “saved” carbon dioxide.

In 2013, European biofuels used enough land to feed 100 million people, and the US program even more. Biofuel subsidies contributed to rising food prices, and their swift growth was reined in only when models showed that up to another 135 million people could starve by 2020. But that means that the hunger of around 30 million people today can likely be attributed to these bad policies.

Moreover, climate policies divert resources from measures that directly reduce hunger. Our priorities seem skewed when climate policies promising a minuscule temperature impact will cost $US1 trillion a year, while the World Food Program’s budget is 169 times lower, at $5.9 billion.

There are effective ways to produce more food. One of the best, as Copenhagen Consensus research has shown, is to get serious about investing in research and development to boost agricultural productivity. Through irrigation, fertiliser, pesticides, and plant breeding, the Green Revolution increased world grain production by an astonishing 250 per cent between 1950 and 1984, raising the calorie intake of the world’s poorest people and averting severe famines. We need to build on this progress.

Investing an additional $US88bn in agricultural research and development over the next 32 years would increase yields by an additional 0.4 percentage points every year, which could save 79 million people from hunger and prevent five million cases of child malnourishment. This would be worth almost $US3 trillion in social good, implying an enormous return of $US34 for every dollar spent. By the end of the century, the additional increase in agricultural productivity would be far greater than the damage to agricultural productivity suggested by even the worst-case scenarios of the effects of global warming.

And there would be additional benefits: the World Bank has found that productivity growth in agriculture can be up to four times more effective in reducing poverty than productivity growth in other sectors.

We are at a turning point. After achieving dramatic gains against hunger and famine, we run the risk of backsliding, owing to poorly considered choices. The stakes are far too high for us to pick the wrong policies.

Bjorn Lomborg is director of the Copenhagen Consensus Centre and a visiting professor at the Copenhagen Business School.

(Climatism bolds added)

Climate-change policies may be making world hunger worse | The Australian

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Related :

UN Related :

 


ENTIRE German village demolished to make way for coal mining

DEAR German “Greens”, who played a major government and activist role in phasing out (CO2-free) nuclear energy, via Fukushima hysteria, and implementing the economic and environmental disastrous #Energiewende, I repeat to you again – “careful what you wish for”!

NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

By Paul Homewood

image

A 19th century church in Germany was demolished this week to make way for coal mining.

St Lambertus Cathedral – a church known by locals as Immerather Dom – in Immerath, a tiny farming village northwest of Cologne, was razed to the ground on Tuesday.

The double-spired church, thought to have been built between 1880 and 1890, was torn down in the latest step in energy company RWE’s demolition of the entire village in a bid to expand its access to the region’s lignite supply.

St Lambertus Church (pictured) was torn down by RWE Power to make way for coal mines despite protests from Greenpeace

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5262641/German-cathedral-torn-make-way-coal-mining.html?ito=social-twitter_mailonline

Perhaps instead of lecturing Donald Trump, our climate conscious MPs should be complaining to Mrs Merkel.

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Leo Hitches A Ride Again!

“Act On Climate” “Climate Action” “Science Says So” “Climate March” “Moral Issue Of Our Time” blah blah blah 🤦‍♂️

NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

By Paul Homewood

ScreenHunter_1783 Jan. 08 18.01

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-5232313/Leonardo-DiCaprio-43-Camila-Morrone-20-arrive-LA.html

Top hypocrite Leo’s been at it again, flying back to LA by private jet from his Aspen skiing holiday. That should really help fight global warming!

Air miles: Environmentalist

The usual excuse was given:

But if he was truly serious, he would be giving his buddies an earful about using such carbon spewing transport, and not encouraging their behaviour.

And if he was really serious, there is always the bus!

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https://www.rome2rio.com/s/Los-Angeles/Aspen

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