Australian Base Load Electrical Power – Week Ending 24th March 2018

SUCH an important and informative weekly piece of (hard) work! Aside from the excellent information provided on the breakdown of energy sources used to power the Australian electrical grid, the main figure in contention is highlighted in red – the percentage of coal-fired power used per day versus all other sources of generation. Not surprising that of a day, coal-fired power generates more than 75% of all energy with wind and solar only ever supplying between 5 and 20% max of intermittent, expensive, unreliable and grid destabilising ‘power’. This despite unreliable-energy states having upwards of 50% capacity installed. It’s no wonder Australia’s electricity prices are among the highest in the world. South Australia officially ‘the highest’ with the highest penetration of highly subsidised unreliables – wind, solar….and a giant battery.

PA Pundits - International

By Anton Lang ~

Week 38

This is the continuing Post, where each Saturday, I will detail the power consumption for the Base Load in Australia for the previous week. This will show what is actually meant by the term Base Load, and that is the minimum daily power consumption at its lowest point. Power consumption never falls below this point.

Here in Australia, that level of power is 18,000MW. (See data for the Running Weekly Average For Base Load below)

The Bayswater Coal Fired Power Plant In New South Wales

This data I have collated below is for this last week, and is for the five States connected to the Australian grids, every State east of the Western Australian border, and here I will show that data for each of those five States, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania.

As you can see from these…

View original post 1,832 more words


IT’S Official : Global Warming Alarmists Have No Credibility On Anything Climate Change

IN 2000, climate expert Dr David Viner of the University of East Anglia’s Climate Research Unit (CRU) assured us that…

Read the rest of this entry »