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Three Years Left Until “A Catastrophe Of Our Own Making.”

Humanity is sitting on a time bomb. If the vast majority of the
world’s scientists are right, we have just ten years to avert a
major catastrophe that could send our entire planet’s climate system
into a tail-spin of epic destruction involving extreme weather, floods,
droughts, epidemics and killer heat waves beyond anything we have
ever experienced – a catastrophe of our own making.

– Al Gore (2006)
An Inconvenient Truth

CHURCH OF CLIMATOLOGY

ACCORDING to Al Gore we have just three years left “to avert a major catastrophe that could send our entire planet’s climate system into a tail-spin of epic destruction involving extreme weatherfloodsdroughtsepidemics and killer heat waves beyond anything we have ever experienced – a catastrophe of our own making.”

Since those words of wisdom in 2006, Al has been setting a fine example on how best to prevent thermageddon…

Tom Nelson’s  research shows what ManBearPig has been actively doing to help save us from “a catastrophe of our own making.”

Where’s Al Gore now?

Obviously, Al Gore’s personal “carbon footprint” is massive. As I dug deeper into Gore’s own energy use, even I was surprised at the extent of the absolutely cartoonish gap between his words and his actions.Remember, Al doesn’t think that you should have the right to make your own hallway light bulb choice.Some recent stops on Gore’s travel schedule (which some are calling his “con-trail”):November 4, 2010–Trinidad and Tobago
October 28, 2010–Gothenburg, Sweden
October 5, 2010–New York
October 4, 2010–Mexico
August 4, 2010–Mexico
July 22, 2010–San Diego
June 28, 2010–San Diego
Late June, 2010-London
May 5, 2010–Beverly Hills
May 5, 2010–Chicago
May 3, 2010–Singapore
April 30, 2010–Philippines
April 29, 2010–Johannesburg, South Africa
April 27, 2010–New York (afternoon)
April 27, 2010–Chicago (morning)
April 26, 2010–Denver
April 24, 2010–Italy
April 22, 2010–Montreal
April 8, 2010–North Carolina
March 27, 2010–Nevada
March 26, 2010–Brazil
March 4, 2010–Oslo
February 27, 2010–Phoenix
February 25, 2010–Cupertino
February 22, 2010–Las Vegas
January 27, 2010–San Francisco
January 16, 2010–Boston
January 14, 2010–New York
December 14, 2009–Copenhagen
December 7, 2009–Washington, DC
November 24, 2009–Toronto
November 19, 2009–Portland, Oregon
November 14, 2009–Boca Raton, Florida
November 9, 2009–San Rafael, CA
November 3, 2009–New York
October 27, 2009–Dubai
October 21, 2009–Beijing
October 16, 2009–Virginia
October 14, 2009–Argentina
October 9, 2009–Madison, Wisconsin
October 1, 2009: Washington, DC
September 28, 2009: Mexico
September 25, 2009–New Jersey
Sept 23, 2009–Pittsburgh
Sept 22, 2009–New York
Sept 19, 2009–San Francisco
Sept 18, 2009–Indianapolis
August 10, 2009–Las Vegas, Nevada
July 11-13, 2009–Melbourne, Australia
July 7, 2009–Oxford, England
June 16, 2009–Seattle
June 3, 2009: New York
May 24, 2009–Copenhagen, Denmark
April 28, 2009–Tromso, Norway
April 24, 2009–Washington, DC
April 23, 2009–Berkeley, California
April 3, 2009–Las Vegas
April 2, 2009–Salt Lake City
April 1, 2009–Chicago
March 30, 2009–Boston
March 27, 2009–New York
March 26, 2009–Tennessee
March 13, 2009–London
March 6, 2009–Santa Barbara
February 25, 2009–Cupertino, CA
February 23, 2009–Washington, DC
February 13, 2009–Chicago
February 12, 2009–Los Angeles
February 2, 2009–San Francisco
January 30, 2009–Davos, Switzerland
January 28, 2009–Washington, DC
January 20, 2009–Washington, DC
January 13, 2009–Philadelphia
December 11, 2008–Poland
December 9, 2008–Chicago
November 20, 2008–New York City
November 14, 2008–SeoulSouth Korea
November 7, 2008–San Francisco
October 24, 2008–Seattle
October 22, 2008–Cambridge, Massachusetts
October 15, 2008–Stockholm
October 13, 2008–Aalsmeer, Netherlands
October 7, 2008–Nashville (!)
October 4, 2008–Des Moines, Iowa
October 4, 2008–Minneapolis
September 27, 2008–Napa
September 27, 2008–San Jose
September 25, 2008–London
September 24, 2008–New York
August 23, 2008–Boulder, Colorado

May 19, 2008–Israel
May 18, 2008–Pittsburgh
May 4, 2008–Ohio
May 3, 2008–Philadelphia
May 2, 2008–New York
April 18, 2008–Nashville
April 15, 2008–Geneva
April 11, 2008–San Francisco
April 8, 2008–Iceland
April 7, 2008–Faroe Islands
April 5, 2008–Montreal
March 18, 2008–New York
March 15, 2008–India
March 12, 2008–Poland
March 11, 2008–Geneva
March 1, 2008–Monterey, California
February 14, 2008–New York City
January 31, 2008–Atlanta
January 24, 2008–Switzerland
January 22, 2008–Sweden
January 19, 2008–Park City, Utah
Dec 13, 2007–Bali
Dec 12, 2007–Frankfurt
Dec 12, 2007–Stockholm
Dec 7, 2007–Norway
November 30, 2007–London
November 20, 2007–The Turks and Caicos Islands
November 19, 2007–New York
November 6, 2007–New York
October 26, 2007–Spain
October 25, 2007–France
October 12, 2007–Palo Alto, California
October 5, 2007–Pacific Palisades, California
Sept. 25, 2007–New York
Sept. 19, 2007–Australia
Sept. 16, 2007–Los Angeles
August 26, 2007 San Francisco
August 26, 2007 Los Angeles
August 26, 2007 Nashville
August 9, 2007–Hong Kong
July 9, 2007–New Jersey
July 9, 2007–Washington, DC
July 3, 2007–London
June 20, 2007–South Africa
June 12, 2007–Istanbul
June 3, 2007–Denver
May 29, 2007–Washington, DC
May 24, 2007–New York City
May 23, 2007–San Francisco
May 22, 2007–Beverly Hills
May 11, 2007–Argentina
April 17, 2007–Nashville
April 13, 2007–New York
April 3, 2007–San Jose
April 2, 2007–Arizona
March 29, 2007–Oslo
March 22, 2007–Montreal
March 12, 2007–London
March 7, 2007–Brussels
February 25, 2007–Hollywood
February 6, 2007–Madrid
January 28, 2007–New York City
January 20, 2007–Century City, California
January 18, 2007–London
January 15, 2007–Tokyo
Note that this is only a partial list.For example:

Gore is a businessman these days —— sitting on the boards of Apple Computer Inc. and Current TV, the cable and satellite channel he started with investor Joel Hyatt —— “and those take him (to the Bay Area) pretty regularly for board meetings and the like,” said his spokeswoman, Kalee Kreider.

When he’s not in a fossil fuel-powered jet, maybe Gore is relaxing in one of these three homes:

[Al and Tipper] have a new multimillion-dollar home in a tony section of Nashville and a family home in Virginia, and have recently bought a multimillion-dollar condo at the St. Regis condo/hotel in San Francisco.

A video of Gore taking a private jet is here.

A related article is here, entitled “Gore home’s energy use: 20 times average”.

More:
  • 2007: Shortly after ManBearPig won the Nobel Prize for his alarmist movie “An Inconvenient Truth”, a British High Court Judge attacked nine key errors of the movie labelling it ‘alarmist’, ‘exaggerated’ and ‘political’.
  • The judge had stated that, if the UK Government had not agreed to send to every secondary school in England a corrected guidance note making clear the mainstream scientific position on these nine “errors”, he would have made a finding that the Government’s distribution of the film and the first draft of the guidance note earlier in 2007 to all English secondary schools had been an unlawful contravention of an Act of Parliament prohibiting the political indoctrination of children. Conveniently, the movie now requires 77 pages of supporting documentation to be shown in any UK classroom.

UPDATE

UPDATE

MUST SEE VIDEO : Al Gore climate hysteria : Prime time : SunNews Video Gallery

Related:

gore

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52% Increase In Arctic Sea Ice Since Last Year

Real Science

Green shows ice present in 2013 but not present on this date in 2012. Red shows the opposite.

ScreenHunter_163 Aug. 13 05.43

Arctic Sea-Ice Monitor

Ice extent is the highest since 2006.

ScreenHunter_164 Aug. 13 05.48COI | Centre for Ocean and Ice | Danmarks Meteorologiske Institut

The Arctic summer was the shortest and coldest on record.

ScreenHunter_165 Aug. 13 05.50

COI | Centre for Ocean and Ice | Danmarks Meteorologiske Institut

Antarctic sea ice extent continues near record levels.

ScreenHunter_166 Aug. 13 05.51

S_stddev_timeseries.png (1050×840)

If alarmists had an ounce of integrity, they would drop their scam. But they don’t and won’t.

View original post


Fear, Complexity and Environmental Management in the 21st Century (Michael Crichton)

“There is no such thing as consensus science. If it’s consensus, it isn’t science. If it’s science, it isn’t consensus. Period.”
― Michael Crichton

“I would remind you to notice where the claim of consensus is invoked. Consensus is invoked only in situations where the science is not solid enough. Nobody says the consensus of scientists agrees that E=mc2. Nobody says the consensus is that the sun is 93 million miles away. It would never occur to anyone to speak that way.” 
― Michael Crichton

“Historically, the claim of consensus has been the first refuge of scoundrels; it is a way to avoid debate by claiming that the matter is already settled. Whenever you hear the consensus of scientists agrees on something or other, reach for your wallet, because you’re being had.”
― Michael Crichton

Regarding the foolishness of simple thinking, especially from our governments around such a complex and unpredictable system as our climate, there is no better read than this talk by the late Michael Crichton, titled Fear, Complexity, & Environmental Management in the 21st Century (November 6, 2005)

Crichton details the enormous fear created by people with misinformed agendas and the disastrous consequences of using “linear thinking” to solve complex problems.

In a system as chaotic, complex and intricate as our Climate, we cannot reduce complex problems down to simple solutions. Sadly, this is not very apparent to our Government masters, especially those in the West who like to solve complex problems with simple policy solutions, such that they are readily accepted by us.

“We need to be flexible in our responses, as we move into a new era of managing complexity. So we have to stop responding to fear.”

Crichton’s brilliant talk is summed up through a quote from Mark Twain

But beyond any given crisis, I want to emphasize the pattern: new fears rise and fall, to be replaced by others that rise and fall. As Mark Twain said, “I’ve seen a heap of trouble in my life, and most of it never came to pass.”

Fear, Complexity, & Environmental Management in the 21st Century 

Washington Center for Complexity and Public Policy

Washington DC

November 6, 2005

By

Michael Crichton

I am going to challenge you today to revise your thinking, and to reconsider some fundamental assumptions.  Assumptions so deeply embedded in our consciousness that we don’t even realize they are there.  Here is a map by the artist Tom Friedman, that challenges certain assumptions.

Seen close up.

But the assumptions I am talking about today represent another kind of map—a map that tells us the way the world works.  Since this is a lecture on complexity, you will not be surprised to hear that one important assumption most people make is the assumption of linearity, in a world that is largely non-linear.  I hope by the end of this lecture that the meaning of that statement will be clear.  But we won’t be getting there in a linear fashion.

Some of you know I have written a book that many people find controversial. It is called State of Fear, and I want to tell you how I came to write it. Because up until five years ago, I had very conventional ideas about the environment and the success of the environmental movement.

The book really began in 1998, when I set out to write a novel about a global disaster. In the course of my preparation, I rather casually reviewed what had happened in Chernobyl, since that was the worst manmade disaster in recent times that I knew about.

What I discovered stunned me.  Chernobyl was a tragic event, but nothing remotely close to the global catastrophe I imagined.  About 50 people had died in Chernobyl, roughly the number of Americans that die every day in traffic accidents.  I don’t mean to be gruesome, but it was a setback for me. You can’t write a novel about a global disaster in which only 50 people die.

Undaunted, I began to research other kinds of disasters that might fulfill my novelistic requirements.  That’s when I began to realize how big our planet really is, and how resilient its systems seem to be. Even though I wanted to create a fictional catastrophe of global proportions, I found it hard to come up with a credible example.  In the end, I set the book aside, and wrote Prey instead.

But the shock that I had experienced reverberated within me for a while.  Because what I had been led to believe about Chernobyl was not merely wrong—it was astonishingly wrong. Let’s review the data.

The initial reports in 1986 claimed 2,000 dead, and an unknown number of future deaths and deformities occurring in a wide swath extending from Sweden to the Black Sea. As the years passed, the size of the disaster increased; by 2000, the BBC and New York Times estimated 15,000-30,000 dead, and so on…

Now, to report that 15,000-30,000 people have died, when the actual number is 56, represents a big error. Let’s try to get some idea of how big.  Suppose we line up all the victims in a row.  If 56 people are each represented by one foot of space, then 56 feet is roughly the distance from me to the fourth row of the auditorium.  Fifteen thousand people is three miles away.  It seems difficult to make a mistake of that scale.

But, of course, you think, we’re talking about radiation: what about long-term consequences?  Unfortunately here the media reports are even less accurate. Keep Reading »